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Coton de Tulear versus AKC and Puppy mills

A Closer Look At Animal Welfare Issues :

BCTV- WEDNESDAY NIGHT

THE COTON de TULEAR versus AKC AND PUPPY MILLS

Host:  Tina Evangelista-Eppenstein

Tune in tomorrow night on BCTV (A Close-Up Look at Animal Welfare Issues) at 6:30 when my guest, Robyn Rosenthal, Secretary for the Advocates for the Coton de Tulear (ACT) and I will continue our discussion on the AKC’s decision to name another Coton de Tulear group as the “parent club” of the breed. Watch and see why this is a bad decision for this breed or any breed of dog.

Find out why the American Kennel Club is a misnomer at best.

With PA’s dog law ready to go into full effect on July 1st, what will this mean for the dogs in puppy mills that are actually supported by the AKC?

With a new Special Deputy Secretary of Agriculture, Lynn Diehl, replacing Jessie Smith, who has no experience with animals but 32 yrs. of a banking background, what will this mean for PA’s commercial kennels?

Find out the answers to these questions and more on tomorrow night’s show. You can streamline live the show at BCTV.

If you have any questions/comments, please feel free to call in during the live program at 610-378-0426. You can email me personally at tevangelistaepp@yahoo.com.

http://www.bctv.org/bctv/see_schedule/

http://readingeagle.com/blog.aspx?bid=74&id=22991&t=BCTV-WEDNESDAY-NIGHT-AKC-VS-THE-COTON

 

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American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

Please sign the petition to help Save the Coton de Tulear from AKC and Puppy Mills!!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/95/Protect-the-rare-breed-Coton-de-Tulear/

 

 

Bandera’s Neonatal Health Testing Fund

 

PRESS RELEASE                                    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Lisa Johnson                          June 15, 2011
ACC Health Committee
HealthCommittee@AmericanCotonClub.com
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

 

AMERICAN COTON CLUB ANNOUNCES HEALTH TESTING FUND


June 15, 2011: The American Coton Club launched a Health Testing Fund for Bandera’s Neonatal Ataxia (BNAt) DNA test for the Coton de Tulear rare breed of dog. The American Coton Club will donate up to $2,000. for the testing of ACC breeding Cotons.

 

The ACC Bandera’s Neonatal Ataxia Health Testing Fund is for ACC Code of Ethics Breeders who choose to DNA test their breeding Cotons. The ACC will reimburse $20.00 per Coton de Tulear to ACC Breeders who test for Bandera’s Syndrome, up to a maximum of 3 Cotons per breeder.

 

The ACC Bandera’s Neonatal Health Testing Fund will be for Cotons tested from May 1, 2011 through September 30, 2011. To reserve your reimbursement please e-mail the ACC Health Committee before sending in your DNA samples. Proof of the completed test must also be forwarded to the ACC Health Committee before reimbursement can occur. Proof of the test can either be your certificate or a receipt from the lab. All test results will remain confidential.

 

If you are an ACC Breeder and you have already completed your testing please send proof of testing to the ACC Health Committee and a reimbursement check will be mailed to you.
Remember ACC will reimburse $20 per Coton, with a maximum number of 3 Cotons per breeder.

 

We hope that the Bandera’s Neonatal Ataxia Health Testing Fund will help defray the cost of the DNA test and will encourage breeders to test their breeding Cotons. Testing your breeding Cotons will ensure no carriers are bred to one another. Testing will allow breeders to make informed breeding decisions so that we can eliminate this disease and never have to hear of a tragic Bandera’s litter being born again.
In the future, we hope to have a fundraiser which might afford the ACC an opportunity to help more Cotons to be tested, and not just ACC Cotons. For now, this is a place to begin, and one we can all be proud of.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the ACC Health Committee.

 

For information on DNA testing please visit the ACC web site: http://www.americancotonclub.com/dnatests.htm

 

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UCARE Supports “ACT”

 

UCARE Supports ACT, Advocates for the Coton de Tulear

 

Announcement from Jeri McClees and Jane Arrington, founders of UCARE:

 

When UCARE was formed in 2002 as the only nonprofit corporation committed to the Rescue of this wonderful breed, our articles of incorporation specified that the corporation was organized for the purpose of preventing and abating animal cruelty by rescuing, treating, altering, fostering and rehoming abused, neglected, ill, stray and unwanted Cotons.  Furthermore, UCARE was developed to educate current and prospective pet owners as to the proper care and breeding of dogs to prevent cruelty and allow them to make informed choices of where to obtain a Coton.

 

Never did we think that to fulfill this charter we would have to take an opposing stance to one of the Coton breed clubs and its goal to have the Coton recognized as an AKC “breed”. History has shown that AKC recognition exponentially increases the number of dogs in puppy mills (or “high volume breeder” facilities using the AKC nomenclature) and subjects those dogs to cruel and inhumane treatment. We feel that we have no choice but to assist in preserving the Coton breed as we know it and join in the battle against AKC recognition.

 

It is with sadness (but pride that others join us in our concerns and our basic goals) that we are making a contribution to the Advocates for the Coton de Tulear (ACT) in the amount of $5,000 in the hopes that it will prod others to join the battle and hopefully assist in winning the war against AKC recognition for the Coton de Tulear. The future of this wonderful breed is at risk if we don’t win that war!

 

Jeri & Jane, UCARE

 

P.S. If you wish to donate or get more information about ACT’s efforts, go to: http://advocatesforthecotondetulear.blogspot.com/

 

Until there are none, please rescue one.
UCARE: a 501(c)3 non-profit organization

The American Coton Club applauds UCARE’s decision!

American Coton Club

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

A Closer Look At Animal Welfare Issues : THE COTON de TULEAR VS. THE AKC

A Closer Look At Animal Welfare Issues :

THE COTON de TULEAR VS. THE AKC

Advocates for the Coton de Tulear

 

By:  Tina Evangelista-Eppenstein

 

On my show tonight, the topic to be discussed will be the rare breed, Coton de Tulear, being recognized by the AKC. There are several National Coton clubs in the nation with one pursuing this recognition from the AKC.

Why would this recognition be a horrendous mistake for this rare breed? What will it mean for the future of this lovable dog? Do you, the animal lover, understand what the AKC stands for? Do they really care about the welfare of the dogs?

Tune in tonight when my guest, Robyn Rosenthal, representative of The Advocates for the Coton de Tulear (ACT), and “Mom” to two Cotons, will discuss this important and timely topic.

You can view this program at 6:30 PM locally on Channe 13 (Comcast), Channel 19 (Service Electric) or you can streamline it and watch it live at BCTV. Please feel free to call in with questions or comments or email  me directly at tevangelistaepp@yahoo.com. You can also catch this show in replays on Friday at 9:30 PM, Saturday at 5:30 PM and Sunday at 8:30 AM. You can also view this show in the archives section as well.

….

About the host and author:  Tina is a  long-time animal advocate, Tina Evangelista-Eppenstein will take on local, national and worldwide issues affecting animals today. Tina will explore puppymills, animal cruelty, the dog fur industry, animal shelter issues, experimental research on animals and so much more. Tina is a local tv talk show host and has been a guest on other tv and radio programs throughout Berks County and beyond. Tina welcomes your comments and questions.

 

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USACTC’s CHUTZPAH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by:
Robert Jay Russell, Ph.D.,
Coton de Tulear Club of America President,

www.cotonclub.org
CotonNews@aol.com
(607) 693-2828

April 14, 2011.

Chutzpah |ˈhoŏtspə; ˈ kh oŏtspə; -spä| (also chutzpa or hutzpah or hutzpa)
noun informal. Shameless audacity; impudence.
ORIGIN late 19th cent.: Yiddish, from Aramaic ḥu ṣpā.


Following the AKC’s rejection of ACTA and its choice of the USACTC for its frontal show organization, the USACTC Board brazenly announced:

 

“Dear USACTC members,

Today we were informed by the AKC, that the USACTC has been chosen to be the Parent Club for AKC. We have attached a copy of the letter. While we understand many of the challenges that face us in the years to come, we are pleased that the Coton de Tulear will now have a strong, single voice to speak for them.

We are in the process of establishing a Code of Ethics for all of our members and will continue to be strong in ourcommitment to work against puppy mills and commercial breeders. We hope that as an AKC Parent Club our voice will be loud and clear on this subject with AKC as well as with the public.

Many new USACTC committees will be formed in the upcoming months to work for the benefit of the Coton de Tulear. We hope that you will consider helping the USACTC protect and work for the breed that we all love so very much.
Very truly yours,

Ruth Weidrick and
The USACTC Board Members”

 

Dr. Russell continues:

Hilarious chutzpah on their part to state that the USACTC is now the “strong, single voice” that speaks for Cotons. Literally thousands more Coton owners and breeders oppose the USACTC and the AKC than support this move, so they err tremendously in proclaiming themselves the sole spokespeople for the breed. The CTCA, now in its 35th year, is vastly larger than their show club and we predate their appearance on the Coton scene by more than 17 years. Anyone who knows anything about the CTCA knows that we have never been silent in our support of the breed that we introduced to the Western world from their homeland of Madagascar in 1974.
If that weren’t a large enough misstatement, Ms. Weidrick goes on to compound her chutzpah by stating that the USACTC will “work against puppy mills and commercial breeders.”

She appears completely unaware that the AKC is the largest registrar of puppy mill dogs in the world, that it is stated policy of the AKC to promote their “Large Scale Breeders Program,” that AKC officials attend and help puppy auctions in the mid-West, and that the AKC supports and endorses the Hunte Corporation, the largest wholesale distributor of commercially produced puppies in the world. The AKC management has never, does not now and obviously will not in the future tolerate any parent club’s challenge to their revenue sources.

The USACTC no longer has a Coton registry. They have no say over what dogs the AKC will register as “AKC Cotons de Tulear.” Ms. Weidrick’s Cotons will join puppy mill bred, pet shop sold Cotons as complete equals in the exact same AKC registry database. Their Coton in the show ring will be indistinguishable from an AKC Coton languishing in a pet shop somewhere. USACTC breeders will produce the same pups as any AKC Coton breeder will.

We in the CTCA feel very, very sorry for the fate of these dogs. And we are thankful that none of our Cotons will be in that unenviable place.

Ms. Weidrick is likely well aware that the mCTCA will remain a “strong voice” in support of the Madagascar Coton de Tulear breed and that unlike her AKC-USACTC, we will be able to maintain a registry, enforce our strict Code of Ethics and health testing for all our breeders and owners, and of course we’ll continue to “work against puppy mills and commercial breeders.”
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copyright 2011 Dr. R. J. Russell & the CTCA
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Thank you to Dr. Russell for publishing this eZine.

American Coton Club

 

 

USACTC delivers the Coton de Tulear to AKC & puppy mills!

The USACTC has been named the AKC Parent Club for the Coton de Tulear. They may have received that privilege but the Coton de Tulear has still not been AKC recognized. There is no standing on the fence any longer. You pick a side and you either fight FOR the Coton or you fight to SHOW the Coton. There are no in betweens. If you are a member of the USACTC Club, then you are pro-AKC and you support Puppy Mills. Please join us in our continued opposition of AKC recognition for the Coton de Tulear!


There are still two Coton de Tulear organizations which will protect the rare breed Coton de Tulear. The American Coton Club and the Coton de Tulear Club of America. Neither organization will ever join the ranks of AKC and the puppy mills they support!!

American Coton Club
Home of the rare breed Coton de Tulear
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

Bad News for Cotons!!!

ADVOCATES FOR THE COTON DE TULEAR “ACT” are concerned for the welfare of the Coton de Tulear.  “ACT” reports USACTC & ACTA seeking AKC recognition for the Coton de Tulear

By: Advocates for the Coton de Tulear 

The 2 Coton de Tulear breed clubs seeking AKC recognition are the USACTC & ACTA. Their members represent a minority voice in the Coton community, as an overwhelming majority of Coton owners & fanciers in the US are vehemently opposed to AKC recognition. “ACT” feels these board members should be accountable for their actions, so please contact them to voice your opposition to AKC recognition.

USACTC Board Members

Responsibility Name Telephone Email
President Ruth Weidrick 859-319-9901 usactcpresident@usactc.org
Vice President Michael Birch 520-731-8004 usactcvp@usactc.org
Membership Secretary J.J. Walker 606-478-8295 usactcmemsecretary@usactc.org
Recording Secretary Rebecca Brown 941-270-1018 usactcrecsecretary@usactc.org
Treasurer Charlotte Cox 281-292-5619 usactctreasurer@usactc.org
Northern Region Rep. Denise Simenauer 269-372-2175 usactcnorthern@usactc.org
Western Region Rep. Jennifer Hermes 909-981-3242 usactcwestern@usactc.org
Central Region Rep. Luis Ortiz 352-241-4557 usactccentral@usactc.org
Eastern Region Rep. Julian Baird 508-255-4063 usactceastern@usactc.org
Southern Region Rep. Brenda Magnon 813-982-0461 usactcsouthern@usactc.org
Past President Barbara Adcock 254-772-7060 usactcpastpresident@usactc.org

Appointed Officers

Responsibility Name Telephone Contact
Championship Point System Carmen Ortiz 352-241-4557 usactcpoints@usactc.org
Website Chairperson Elaine Baird 508-255-4063 usactcweb@usactc.org
Newsletter Editor Nancy Wolinski usactcnewsletter@usactc.org
Registrar Juli Renois 817-614-1647 usactcregistrar@usactc.org
ACTA Board
Responsibility Name Telephone Email
President Diane Rinella 949-874-7055 dirinella@me.com
Vice President Marla Gass 425-836-8182 marla589@yahoo.com
Secretary Debra Nemrow 909-240-0575 danemrow@verizon.net
Treasurer Justine Romano 973-541-1111 justine@justincrediblecotons.com
Board of Directors Pamela Heidinger 520-615-9815 Chateauctn@aol.com
Board of Directors Kennette Tabor 757-421-7685 Cottonkist@aol.com
Board of Directors Pat Enright 631-957-1189 Diamnkrest@aol.com
Western Regional Delegate Bev Kohler 360-357-7624 bevkohler@yahoo.com
Eastern Regional Delegate Pam Brown 757-421-3072 pambrown427@gmail.com
Rescue Coordinator Adrianne Dering 770-241-0489 hopecrestcoton@yahoo.com

AKC Finds New Source to Produce Puppy “Papers” Revenue

By: Jenny Stephens, North Penn Puppy Mill Watch


Gullible: adjective: naive and easily deceived or tricked

 

Would you buy a Rolex watch from a sidewalk vendor for $25.00 and actually believe that you’re purchasing the identical watch that sells for thousands of dollars at “reputable” fine jewelry stores?

When it comes to dogs, gullible consumers actually believe that “papers” lend credence to the health and quality of the dog. Sadly, most buyers are purchasing a false sense of security.

In reality, the source of a puppy largely determines whether or not the “papers” accompanying the canine are suitable for framing or better used for housebreaking and the AKC’s own website inasmuch says so.

There is a widely held belief that “AKC” or “AKC papers” guarantee the quality of a dog. This is not the case.

AKC is a registry body.

A registration certificate identifies the dog as the offspring of a known sire and dam, born on a known date.

It in no way indicates the quality or state of health of the dog.

Quality in the sense of “show quality” is determined by many factors including the dog’s health, physical condition, ability to move and appearance. Breeders breeding show stock are trying to produce animals that closely resemble the description of perfection described in the breed standard.

“Many people breed their dogs with no concern for the qualitative demands of the breed standard. When this occurs repeatedly over several generations, the animals, while still purebred, can be of extremely low quality.”

The American Kennel Club derives millions of dollars each year from the sale of “papers” and so, too, do several other quasi-registries including the ACA and APRI. Unless the dog being purchased comes from a long line of champions and the buyer has a desire to show or breed, the majority of puppy “paper” purchases are largely a waste of money on a meaningless piece of processed tree pulp.

For years advocates have maintained that if “reputable” breeders REALLY cared about the health and welfare of their respective breeds they would stand up to the AKC’s attempt to push “papers” and say: ENOUGH. Essentially, they would publicly acknowledge that the sale of “papers” is a racket used for one purpose and one purpose only: to produce revenue.

Were this to happen, “reputable” breeders could corner the market on purebreds and essentially help put large scale commercial breeding kennels, along with pet shops, out of business. Too bad they don’t.

So intent is the AKC to make money from commercial breeding that they have, historically and to this day, opposed, refuted and/or contested practically every measure created that would bolster state and federal regulations intended to improve the health and welfare conditions for breeder dogs in large scale kennels… aka: puppy mills.

As we all know, it’s impossible to “unring” a bell. Such is the case with the Coton de Tulear. Currently classified as a rare breed, this small fluffy white dog stands to be exploited by the AKC if, at the behest of certain breeders, the behemoth registry “recognizes” the Coton.

The primary Coton de Tulear club in the United States, the ACC, is nauseated by the thought of AKC recognition. Why? Because they know that once this happens the floodgates will open and commercial breeding kennels across the country will be producing the Coton in staggering numbers. Pet shops will carry Cotons. Mini-Cotons will appear as will Coton-Poos, Shih-Cotons and just about any other conceivable variety of mixed mating. The Coton will appear on Craig’s List. The only thing worse than the AKC recognizing the Coton would be Disney films producing a flick featuring the breed!

As an advocate for dogs trapped in puppy mills and for canines sitting in shelters and rescues awaiting future homes, I struggled with this issue.

Doing nothing will neither protect the Coton de Tulear or prevent future breeding of these dogs.

That said, I’d rather help expose the AKC for its endeavors to exploit a small little white dog for the purpose of producing revenue and to possibly help shelters and rescues from being inundated with the breed once those who have purchased a readily available Coton decide “this isn’t the dog for me” and dumps them… a tragic scene played over and over again with too many of the “recognized” breeds.

The ACC has been in contact with the AKC. According to club president, Hailey Parker, the AKC has dodged their questions, ignored their concerns, removed their contact information from the AKC website and intends to move toward selecting an AKC Parent Club in mid April – the first step toward acquiring “recognition.”

Seems like strange behavior for a registry who purports to have the best interest of dogs at heart but would appear to be typical for a club known to produce revenue at the expense of the health and welfare of dogs trapped in mills.

To help voice your opinion that AKC should NOT recognize the Coton and possibly prevent the exploitation of yet ANOTHER breed, please sign the ACC petition: click HERE

At a minimum, you will send the AKC a strong message: advocates are sick and tired of cleaning up the mess that occurs when the club “recognizes” a breed. Let them know that you’re on to their scam of selling meaningless papers to uninformed consumers and that to exploit yet ANOTHER breed for the purpose of lining their pockets is simply despicable.

To read the full history of what has happened to the Coton de Tulear, visit the ACC homepage: Click HERE

Please Cross Post!

 

Thank you to Jenny Stephens for her great article supporting the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear!

 

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com/SayNOtoAKC.htm

 

 

2011 Coton de Tulear Party

2010 Coton de Tulear Hosting crew

2011 Coton de Tulear Party in Southern California.

 

 

 

 

Invitation to the 10th Annual Coton de Tulear Party!!!


Date: Saturday, March 26th, 2011.

Time: 11:00 a.m. – until the last person leaves. (not beyond a week)

Place: Hoof ‘n’ Paw Haven (Bruce and Coreen’s place)

It’s almost here!  Don’t miss out!

Description: This party is an opportunity for people and Cotons to meet new and old friends.  Many Coton family reunions take place at the party. All people who love Cotons are welcomed.  Invite anyone you know who are Coton owners and friends.  Food and drinks are provided by the hosts.   Guests are more than welcome to bring a favorite snack or beverage, but it is not necessary.

Coreen and Bruce

 

 

Party hosted by Bruce and Coreen Savikko, Code of Ethics Breeders with the American Coton Club.

 

 

 

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

 

 

The American Kennel Club can not survive in its present form. Judges and show breeders are deserting as AKC puts dollars, deals and puppy mills first.

Barbara J. Andrews, Editor-In-Chief of TheDogPress published the following information about the AKC in their newsletter today.

The AKC FAQ facts page states:
Internationally, there are approximately 400 breeds that are listed with registry organizations in other countries. The AKC, however, does not register all of these breeds, either because there are too few dogs (of that breed) in this country or there is too little interest among owners of these breeds to obtain AKC registered status. Because the AKC is a “club of clubs,” owners of a particular breed, wishing to have that breed registered, must establish an organized National Breed Club.                                
http://www.akc.org/press_center/facts_stats.cfm?page=8

Please let the AKC know that the owners of purebred Coton de Tuléar have no interest in AKC. Sign the petition to Save the Coton de Tuléar dog breed from the AKC and puppymills!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/95/Protect-the-rare-breed-Coton-de-Tulear/

Cotons say NO to AKC!

Save the Coton de Tulear from AKC and puppy mills!

Take action- Sign the petition to help save the rare breed Coton de Tulear

A petition is being sponsored by the American Coton Club, the Coton de Tulear Club of America and all Coton lovers who are concerned about the welfare of the rare breed Coton de Tulear.  Please sign the petition and ask your Coton families to sign the petition.   Coton lovers can unite and send a powerful statement to the AKC in support of keeping the Coton a rare breed dog.

The Coton de Tuléar is a rare breed with amazing qualities and a healthy gene pool not yet spoiled by poor breeding practices and over breeding. Thousands of companion owners cherish this breed and want it to remain a rare breed and not in the hands of AKC.

Help save the Rare Breed Coton de Tuléar!!!

Please join the American Coton Club, the Coton de Tulear Club of America, Coton breeders, exhibitors, companion owners and the Coton community at large, who all wish to protect the Rare Breed Coton de Tuléar.

Help preserve the health, well-being, and genetic integrity of this wonderful breed. Please take action and sign this petition.

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/95/Protect-the-rare-breed-Coton-de-Tulear/

Tell the AKC that the Coton de Tuléar is healthy and safe as a Rare Breed.

The future of this wonderful breed is in your hands.

Let your voice be heard.   Say No To AKC!!

The results of this petition will be forwarded to AKC.


Please also consider calling, sending an e-mail or writing a letter to the AKC to express your objection to AKC recognition of the Coton de Tuléar.

Please Contact:
Mari Beth O’Neil and Christine Weisse
fss@akc.org
AKC Customer Care
8051 Arco Corporate Drive, Suite 100
Raleigh, NC 27617-3390
Phone AKC 919-233-9767

There are 4 National Coton de Tuléar breed clubs. Only three (3) of those clubs require mandatory health testing of breeding Cotons. Ethical Breeders and impassioned companion owners are dedicated to preserving the health, well-being, and genetic integrity of the Coton de Tuléar and want to see this breed remain healthy.

Last year one of the clubs (USACTC) announced its intention to pursue AKC recognition of the rare breed Coton de Tuléar. That club received less than 100 votes from members of their club to move forward with AKC recognition. Over 700 Coton owners signed a petition against AKC recognition. In fact, the majority of the Coton community responded extremely negatively to the prospect of full AKC recognition for the Coton de Tuléar breed. There has been worldwide support to save the Coton de Tuléar from AKC, puppy mills, and puppy brokers. Despite this support, AKC continues to pursue the Coton de Tuléar dog breed. Now a new club (formerly defunct) has stated their intention to take the Coton to AKC.

The AKC (American Kennel Club) is simply a for profit dog registry. AKC does not require health testing nor does the AKC verify the validity of registrations that are submitted to their registry service. As of October 14, 2010 there were 1590 Coton de Tuléar registered in the AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS). 1383 of the 1590 have three (3) generation pedigrees.
AKC has a long history of allowing puppy mills, high volume breeders, commercial breeders, and pet shop breeders to register their “Cotons” through the AKC-FSS program, which began accepting Cotons in 1996. The Coton de Tulear has many more than three generations and has ancestry with traceable lineage back to its roots in Madagascar.  AKC registration numbers seem to indicate that the majority of the AKC-FSS pedigrees issued to “Coton de Tulear” have only 3 generation pedigrees.  Why is that important?  On the date that AKC recognizes the Coton de Tuléar each of those 1383 3-generation pedigrees of likely questionable origin will be accepted into the Coton de Tuléar Stud Book.  All of those “Cotons” will get the AKC seal of approval and will dilute and weaken an otherwise healthy gene pool.  It matters not if they came from a puppy mill, pet shop, puppy mill auction or puppy broker.  They will not be required to have DNA testing to verify parentage, nor must they conform to the breed standard or be health tested.

This is simply unacceptable to those of us who love this charming rare breed and wish it to remain healthy and protect the gene pool of the rare breed Coton de Tuléar from Madagascar.

Petition sponsored by the American Coton Club and the Coton de Tulear Club of America

American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

UPDATE: Lost Coton de Tulear FOUND!!

FOUND Coton de Tulear in Colorado

UPDATE:  Sierra, the lost Coton de Tulear dog in Snowmass, Colorado has been reunited with her owner Kris Forke.

Sierra is back safe and sound! She is full of stick tights/cockle burrs and her back nails have been worn down to the quick. She was found quite a ways away from home running down a county road, running in the tire tracks during the snow storm. A rancher recognized she didn’t belong out there and took her to the Aspen shelter. Thank God!

Miracles do happen! I want to thank each and every one of you who prayed and sent me a message. I will respond to each of you when I can.

Prayers and thoughts do work and I appreciate each and every one of them. Many people were very helpful by spreading the word, and I’m humbled by your efforts. I know the Coton community can be very divided at times but when a Coton’s life is in danger I know we all rally for the cause. And I love you all for that!

Now I have a grooming job to do on Sierra and hope I don’t need to shave her to the skin.

Thank you so much,

Kris

Old Snowmass Cotons

This is wonderful news and we are all so happy for Kris and Sierra!!!



American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

LOST – Coton de Tulear

LOST Coton de Tulear

LOST Coton de Tulear in Colorado

LOST Coton de Tulear

Coton missing in Snowmass, Colorado.

Snowmass is near Aspen, Colorado.  Sierra is a white female Coton de Tulear.  If you see a small white dog in this area please call her owner, Kris Forke, immediately to let her know you may have seen Sierra.

Sierra has been missing since 11am on Sunday, October 24, 2010.

Please call if you think you may have spotted Sierra.

970-927-4657

Details:

Sierra was lost from Little Elk Creek Subdivision in Snowmass Colorado at around 11am Sunday Oct. 24, 2010.  Two (2) people saw her around noon but they couldn’t get her.   She’s not been seen since.

The Sheriff’s Department has been notified and will call all shelters, animal control, area veterinarians, radio stations, etc. tomorrow.

Please help Kris find her Coton.  If you know anyone in Colorado please send a link to this post.  We want to help Sierra get back home to Kris!!

Kris Forke

Snowmass, Colorado

phone: 970-927-4657
snowcoton@gmail.com
www.oldsnowmasscotons.com

This alert is provided by the American Coton Club.  Permission granted to cross-post.

American Coton Club

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

Coton de Tulear Photo Contest Winners

1st Place Winner in Coton de Tulear photo contest

 
The American Coton Club, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to providing education and information about the Coton de Tuléar to the public in order to contribute to the health and preservation of this rare breed, announced today, the winners of their Coton de Tuléar photo contest.

 
Many wonderful photos of Cotons de Tuléar were entered into the photo contest and members of the American Coton Club (ACC) voted on the winners.  First place was won by Laura Esau of Glenn Meadow Cottage Cotons de Tulear in Delta, Colorado.  Laura Esau won a $50.00 prize as well as two skeins of alpaca yarn which were donated by Hailey Parker, President of the American Coton Club.

 
Second place winner went to Marilyn Postelle-Kolenski of Sandcastle Coton de Tulear.  Marilyn and her husband Ed Kolenski reside in Ninole, Hawaii and will receive a $25.00 check from the American Coton Club for their winning photograph.

 
The winners faced stiff competition against a gallery of great Coton photos from members of the ACC who are adored by their Coton companions as well as photos from ACC Code of Ethics Breeders.  To view all of the photographs entered into the American Coton Club photo contest visit the Photo Contest web page on the ACC site.  The full URL is http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com/PhotoContest.htm

2nd Place Winner in Coton photo contest

 
ACC hopes to hold more photo contests in the near future and is considering opening up voting to the general public on its social media pages such as Facebook, Twitter and Yahoo Groups.

 
Visit the American Coton Club on their ACC Facebook profile, as well as the ACC Facebook page and Facebook Coton Tales group.

 

 
Thank you to all who entered the ACC Photo Contest!  Many could argue that all are winning photographs!

 

 
American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 
ACC

 

Coton de Tulear Photo Contest

Coton photo contest

Coton de Tulear photo contestant

The American Coton Club photo Contest is underway!

There are two categories:

  • “Funniest Photo”
  • “I didn’t do it and you can’t prove it!”

There will be a 1st and 2nd prize awarded .

  • 1st prize – The owner of the photo getting the most number of votes will receive a cash prize of $50.00 and two skeins of alpaca yarn.
  • 2nd prize –  The owner of the photo getting the most votes after first place will receive a $25.00 cash prize.

Photo contest is available only to members of the American Coton Club.

ACC Members may submit a maximum of 2 photos.  Please do not submit photos with embedded text or writing.  All photos will be presented to ACC  members without names or owner information and ACC members will vote on the winners.

*Board members and family are not eligible to participate.

Photos should be submitted by September 19, 2010 and ACC Members will vote on September 20-21, 2010.  The winners will be announced on September 22, 2010.

Please submit all photos to Photos@AmericanCotonClub.com.

Make sure to include the owner name with the photo and the category you wish to enter your photo in.  Please do not submit photos with borders or special effects.


~~ Voting to begin soon!!! Hurry to submit your winning photograph. ~~

http://www.americancotonclub.com/PhotoContest.htm


For Code of Ethics Breeders & Coton Availability

visit the

American Coton Club web site

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com



Veterinarians report mysterious link between dog food and hypercalcemia

Veterinary Information Network (VIN) reports:

Veterinarians are trying to discern whether roughly a dozen dogs testing positive for hypercalcemia and consuming the same high-end diet is merely coincidence or a problem with the pet food in question.

 

The reports have cropped up on the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession and parent of the VIN News Service. In message board discussions, veterinarians have revealed cases of hypercalcemia secondary to vitamin D toxicosis occurring in dogs that eat a single brand of dry pet food: Blue Buffalo Wilderness Diet, chicken flavor. In each of the cases, veterinarians report that dogs’ conditions have improved after switching brands.

 

So far, nothing concrete has identified a causal relationship between the food and illnesses in dogs. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), while reportedly alerted to adverse events tied to the food, has not prompted a recall, though the VIN News Service has been unable to reach officials with the regulatory agency directly.

 

Officials with Wilton, Conn.-based Blue Buffalo report that “tens of thousands of dollars” and hundreds of hours have been spent analyzing various batches of dog food, including samples from bags directly linked to specific cases of dogs testing positive for hypercalcemia and vitamin D toxicity.

 

Richard MacLean, vice president of business affairs, says one thing is certain: Test results thus far have shown nothing unusual about the product’s formulation; amounts of calcium and vitamin D, in particular, are within the company’s specifications and well below levels that might be considered toxic.

 

The company’s focus has been on Blue Buffalo Wilderness Chicken Recipe, manufactured in April 2010 with a best-used-by date of July 2011.

 

Vitamin D toxicity, or hypervitaminosis D, induces bone loss and abnormally high serum calcium levels, which could result in kidney stones and the calcification of organs like the heart and kidneys if left untreated.

 

“We really do take very seriously our commitment to providing health nutrition to pets,” MacLean says. “From the moment this issue came up, we are looking to find out if this is something we can do something about.”

 

Dr. Joy Mueller, a veterinarian in Santa Rosa, Calif., says the condition isn’t one that an owner will likely miss.

 

Recently, her two-year-old Australian shepherd became lethargic, releasing copious amounts of extremely dilute urine throughout her house and drinking large amounts of water. Heeding the red flags, she tested the dog’s blood and noted elevated calcium levels and a low platelet count. Hypercalcemia is often associated with kidney cancer and lymphoma.

 

Yet after ruling out possible problems with kidney function, Mueller turned to the Blue Buffalo Wilderness chicken and turkey flavored dry food that the dog had been eating for two weeks and changed brands.

 

The result was dramatic; the dog’s condition improved within 24 hours.

 

Mueller came to the association between the food and her dog’s condition independently of the VIN discussions on the topic, though she did not test her dog for elevated levels of vitamin D and cannot be certain that toxic levels of it prompted the animal’s illness. Still, she e-mailed the VIN News Service last Friday to spread the word about her findings to other veterinarians.

 

Reflecting on the turn of events, she says: “Vitamin D toxicosis was not my first thought. Various types of cancer including kidney cancer were the big rule outs. I wasn’t thinking food until I switched him.”

 

While Mueller believes that the food is tied to her dog’s condition, she suspects the reaction was idiosyncratic.

 

“It’s such a dramatic response that if a large number of dogs that ate this food had it, you would hear about more cases,” she says. “You can’t miss it peeing all the time and going through gallons of water.

 

“I suspect this has more to do with the dogs than the food,” Mueller adds. “I’m thinking beyond vitamin D. There may be dogs that have a genetic predisposition to the developing this condition after eating this food. It’s quite a mystery.”

 

Dr. Kathryn Cochran, a practitioner in Michigan, agrees. She reports that dogs of two different clients were examined in the practices where she works on June 30 and July 16. Both presented with hypercalcemia and test results showed high levels of vitamin D.

 

Another common thread: Both ate Blue Buffalo Wilderness Diet, chicken flavor, purchased at a PetSmart in Traverse City, Mich.

 

Cochran’s employer, Dr. Charles Morrison, posted the cases on VIN, and called the company. As a result, Blue Buffulo’s MacLean reports that seven bags were pulled from the Traverse City PetSmart, and tests were conducted on two. He reiterates that nothing unusual has come back on any of the samples analyzed by the company’s labs.

 

Cochran reports that the dogs have since recovered after being switched to a different brand of pet food. She notes that Blue Buffalo has been proactive about paying for tests, sending out claim forms and preparing to make restitution to owners if the product is found to have caused illness.

 

She’s concerned that other cases might not be identified.

 

“I’ve been tearing my hair out trying to get people to talk to me on this,” she says. “Maybe there are more cases out there like this.”

 

Experts in the field of diagnostics think so, too. Dr. Kent Refsal, an endocrinologist with the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health at Michigan State University, works at one of the only labs in America running tests for vitamin D toxicity.

 

“So if a veterinarian has an animal with an abnormality of calcium, they go through lists of differential diagnoses,” Refsal explains. “Our tests can sort through that. In terms of the kind of test outcomes we get, we do not see many instances that raise concern about vitamin D toxicosis.”

 

Considering the rarity of such events, Refsal took notice when the sample from Cochran tested positive for elevated levels of vitamin D.

 

Three weeks later, when Refsal received two samples in the same assay run from dogs in Texas showing evidence of vitamin D excess, he contacted the clinics in question and determined that the dogs were eating food from Blue Buffalo.

 

Since then, Refsal reports that similar tests results from two dogs in Colorado have Blue Buffalo-produced food as the common factor. The lab, he says, has contacted the Michigan Department of Agriculture with the findings, though the VIN News Service could not immediately reach agency officials concerning the cases.

 

“If someone is presented with a question of vitamin D toxicosis, you wonder whether the animal has been put on some kind of unusual dietary supplement. Our assay is just an indicator of vitamin D intake. It does not identify the source of it,” Refsal says.

 

Apart from diet, there are other possible explanations for hypervitaminosis D in animals, including exposure to vitamin D analogs like calcipotriene-based psoriasis creams or pest control products made of cholecalciferol.

 

Veterinarians like Mueller say those explanations are highly unlikely, and even MacLean, of Blue Buffalo, believes that it’s possible that there is a relationship between the food and the handful of sick dogs eating the product.

 

Yet, he cautions, no one has scientifically proven the link. He also notes that reports of at least three other dogs exhibiting signs of hypercalcemia and elevated vitamin D levels without a connection to Blue Buffalo products have surfaced on VIN.

 

MacLean reiterates that the company’s tests of its dog food have come back as low to mid-level for vitamin D content.

 

“Everything that we have suggests that it’s not our food,” he says. “We have 30,000 bags of this stuff out there and literally a dozen animals that have a common symptom. On an incident rate, that doesn’t invite the conclusion that there’s something defective about the product.”

 

 

August 31, 2010
By: Jennifer Fiala
For The VIN News Service

 

 

American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

 

K9 College Cruise

K9 College is fun!

Katie Markley is happy to announce that Sue Vroom will be back on board with us in 2011 to conduct her new dog handling seminar. During her seminar, “Tips and Techniques for Traumaless Dog Showing”, Sue will draw from her lifetime of experience as a professional handler to help Owner/Handlers improve their chances in the conformation ring.

Many other seminars will be conducted during the 7th annual K9 College Cruise.  You’re sure to find many that will interest you!  Call today to reserve your kennel!  You’ll find detailed information at the K9 College website:  www.k9collegecruise.com

Other seminars to be presented during the 2011 K9 College Cruise include:

  • Managing Puppy Development to Maximize Potential, Dr. Carmen Battaglia
  • Pedigree Analysis for a Better Breeding Program, Dr. Carmen Battaglia
  • Immunology and Nutrition, Dr. Jill Cline
  • Probiotics, Dr. Jill Cline
  • Law for Dogs: A Primer for Breeders and Owners, Lisa Curry, Esq.
  • K9 Structure in Action, Pat Hastngs
  • Tricks of the Trade, Pat Hastings
  • K9 Reproduction, Dr. Robert Van Hutchison
  • K9 Pediatrics – Dr. Robert Van Hutchison
  • Genetics for the 21st Century, Dr. Anita Oberbauer
  • Genetic Tests, Dr. Anita Oberbauer
  • Ask Mary! ~ Agility, Rally, Obedience, Flyuball, Freestyle, Mary Ray
  • Preparing the Dog for a Mentally & Physically Healthy Life, Turid Rugaas
  • The Emotional Lives of Dogs, Turid Rugaas

Hope to meet you on-board!


If any Coton de Tulear owners or breeders attend please let us know and we’ll post an update about your trip here on the Coton de Tulear News page.


cruise ship itinerary

Looks like a great trip!

 

 

 

 

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com


CASE REPORT: Suspected acute meperidine toxicity in a Coton de Tulear dog

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Observations

A 22-month-old male neutered Coton De Tulear dog was presented for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy under general anesthesia. The anesthetic plan included premedication with intramuscular meperidine (4 mg kg−1) but meperidine was inadvertently administered at ten-fold this dose. Within 5 minutes, the dog was unresponsive to external stimulation, and by 10 minutes post-injection developed generalized signs of central nervous system (CNS) excitement.  Initial therapy included inspired oxygen supplementation, and single intravenous (IV) doses of diazepam (0.68 mg kg−1) and naloxone (0.03 mg kg−1) to no effect.   A second dose of diazepam (0.46 mg kg−1, IV) abolished most of the signs of CNS excitement. General anesthesia was induced and the endoscopy performed.  Time to extubation was initially prolonged, but administering naloxone (final dose 0.1 mg kg−1, IV) to effect enabled extubation. After naloxone, the dog became agitated, noise sensitive, and had leg and trunk muscle twitches. Diazepam (0.30 mg kg−1, IV) abolished these signs and the dog became heavily sedated and laterally recumbent. Naloxone administration was continued as a constant rate infusion (0.02 mg kg−1 hour−1, IV) until approximately 280 minutes post-meperidine injection, at which time the dog suddenly sat up. Occasional twitches of the leg and trunk muscles were observed during the night.   The dog was discharged the next day appearing clinically normal.

Conclusions

Given that the CNS excitatory effects of normeperidine are not a μ opioid receptor effect, the use of naloxone should be considered carefully when normeperidine excitotoxicity is suspected.   Benzodiazepines may be beneficial in ameliorating clinical signs of normeperidine excitotoxicity.

Full published study is available in

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Volume 37, Issue 5, pages 471–477, September 2010

  1. Francis J Golder1,
  2. Jeffrey Wilson1,
  3. M Paula Larenza1,
  4. Owen T Fink2

 

Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-2995.2010.00553.x

 

 

 

Alert provided by the American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

 

 

Advanced Canine Reproduction and Puppy Care by Myra Savant Harris, R.N.

Author: Myra Savant Harris

Famed author and breeder Myra Savant Harris has a new book available for pre-orders from the American Coton Club aStore through Amazon.

Visit the American Coton Club and place your order now.  A must-read for every breeder!

http://www.americancotonclub.com/store.htm

American Coton Club

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

World Traveling Coton de Tulear dog celebrates 12th birthday

Famous Coton de Tulear turns 12 years old

Happy Birthday Mon Cherie!

There is a Coton de Tulear known around the world.  Mon Cherie is her name and traveling is her game.

Mon Cherie is the Travel Correspondent and Consultant for the American Coton Club, Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear.  Her mom, Heidi Petran, calls her MC and today they will celebrate MC’s 12th birthday.  Cotons de Tulear are a healthy breed overall and can live 15-17 years, so MC has many good years ahead of her!

The American Coton Club wishes MC a very Happy Birthday.

Mon Cherie and BFF Olivia

Mon Cherie prepares for her birthday party with best buddy Olivia

Mon Cherie’s mom states that MC will have a little birthday bash later today.  Present at the party will be her best friend Olivia who is another Coton de Tulear.  Olivia is a youngster and she just wants to have fun and party.

If you would like to read more about Mon Cherie and her travels please visit the American Coton Club web site where Mon Cherie will be adding stories about her traveling adventures. Here’s a sneak peek:   Mon Cherie’s German Adventure

For information about the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear visit the American Coton Club web site.  Membership is $25. and  includes a subscription to the Whole Dog Journal, the Consumer Reports for dog owners.

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com