Posts Tagged ‘breeding’

UCARE Supports “ACT”

 

UCARE Supports ACT, Advocates for the Coton de Tulear

 

Announcement from Jeri McClees and Jane Arrington, founders of UCARE:

 

When UCARE was formed in 2002 as the only nonprofit corporation committed to the Rescue of this wonderful breed, our articles of incorporation specified that the corporation was organized for the purpose of preventing and abating animal cruelty by rescuing, treating, altering, fostering and rehoming abused, neglected, ill, stray and unwanted Cotons.  Furthermore, UCARE was developed to educate current and prospective pet owners as to the proper care and breeding of dogs to prevent cruelty and allow them to make informed choices of where to obtain a Coton.

 

Never did we think that to fulfill this charter we would have to take an opposing stance to one of the Coton breed clubs and its goal to have the Coton recognized as an AKC “breed”. History has shown that AKC recognition exponentially increases the number of dogs in puppy mills (or “high volume breeder” facilities using the AKC nomenclature) and subjects those dogs to cruel and inhumane treatment. We feel that we have no choice but to assist in preserving the Coton breed as we know it and join in the battle against AKC recognition.

 

It is with sadness (but pride that others join us in our concerns and our basic goals) that we are making a contribution to the Advocates for the Coton de Tulear (ACT) in the amount of $5,000 in the hopes that it will prod others to join the battle and hopefully assist in winning the war against AKC recognition for the Coton de Tulear. The future of this wonderful breed is at risk if we don’t win that war!

 

Jeri & Jane, UCARE

 

P.S. If you wish to donate or get more information about ACT’s efforts, go to: http://advocatesforthecotondetulear.blogspot.com/

 

Until there are none, please rescue one.
UCARE: a 501(c)3 non-profit organization

The American Coton Club applauds UCARE’s decision!

American Coton Club

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

USACTC delivers the Coton de Tulear to AKC & puppy mills!

The USACTC has been named the AKC Parent Club for the Coton de Tulear. They may have received that privilege but the Coton de Tulear has still not been AKC recognized. There is no standing on the fence any longer. You pick a side and you either fight FOR the Coton or you fight to SHOW the Coton. There are no in betweens. If you are a member of the USACTC Club, then you are pro-AKC and you support Puppy Mills. Please join us in our continued opposition of AKC recognition for the Coton de Tulear!


There are still two Coton de Tulear organizations which will protect the rare breed Coton de Tulear. The American Coton Club and the Coton de Tulear Club of America. Neither organization will ever join the ranks of AKC and the puppy mills they support!!

American Coton Club
Home of the rare breed Coton de Tulear
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

The American Kennel Club can not survive in its present form. Judges and show breeders are deserting as AKC puts dollars, deals and puppy mills first.

Barbara J. Andrews, Editor-In-Chief of TheDogPress published the following information about the AKC in their newsletter today.

The AKC FAQ facts page states:
Internationally, there are approximately 400 breeds that are listed with registry organizations in other countries. The AKC, however, does not register all of these breeds, either because there are too few dogs (of that breed) in this country or there is too little interest among owners of these breeds to obtain AKC registered status. Because the AKC is a “club of clubs,” owners of a particular breed, wishing to have that breed registered, must establish an organized National Breed Club.                                
http://www.akc.org/press_center/facts_stats.cfm?page=8

Please let the AKC know that the owners of purebred Coton de Tuléar have no interest in AKC. Sign the petition to Save the Coton de Tuléar dog breed from the AKC and puppymills!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/95/Protect-the-rare-breed-Coton-de-Tulear/

Cotons say NO to AKC!

Coton de Tulear Photo Contest Winners

1st Place Winner in Coton de Tulear photo contest

 
The American Coton Club, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to providing education and information about the Coton de Tuléar to the public in order to contribute to the health and preservation of this rare breed, announced today, the winners of their Coton de Tuléar photo contest.

 
Many wonderful photos of Cotons de Tuléar were entered into the photo contest and members of the American Coton Club (ACC) voted on the winners.  First place was won by Laura Esau of Glenn Meadow Cottage Cotons de Tulear in Delta, Colorado.  Laura Esau won a $50.00 prize as well as two skeins of alpaca yarn which were donated by Hailey Parker, President of the American Coton Club.

 
Second place winner went to Marilyn Postelle-Kolenski of Sandcastle Coton de Tulear.  Marilyn and her husband Ed Kolenski reside in Ninole, Hawaii and will receive a $25.00 check from the American Coton Club for their winning photograph.

 
The winners faced stiff competition against a gallery of great Coton photos from members of the ACC who are adored by their Coton companions as well as photos from ACC Code of Ethics Breeders.  To view all of the photographs entered into the American Coton Club photo contest visit the Photo Contest web page on the ACC site.  The full URL is http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com/PhotoContest.htm

2nd Place Winner in Coton photo contest

 
ACC hopes to hold more photo contests in the near future and is considering opening up voting to the general public on its social media pages such as Facebook, Twitter and Yahoo Groups.

 
Visit the American Coton Club on their ACC Facebook profile, as well as the ACC Facebook page and Facebook Coton Tales group.

 

 
Thank you to all who entered the ACC Photo Contest!  Many could argue that all are winning photographs!

 

 
American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 
ACC

 

Veterinarians report mysterious link between dog food and hypercalcemia

Veterinary Information Network (VIN) reports:

Veterinarians are trying to discern whether roughly a dozen dogs testing positive for hypercalcemia and consuming the same high-end diet is merely coincidence or a problem with the pet food in question.

 

The reports have cropped up on the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession and parent of the VIN News Service. In message board discussions, veterinarians have revealed cases of hypercalcemia secondary to vitamin D toxicosis occurring in dogs that eat a single brand of dry pet food: Blue Buffalo Wilderness Diet, chicken flavor. In each of the cases, veterinarians report that dogs’ conditions have improved after switching brands.

 

So far, nothing concrete has identified a causal relationship between the food and illnesses in dogs. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), while reportedly alerted to adverse events tied to the food, has not prompted a recall, though the VIN News Service has been unable to reach officials with the regulatory agency directly.

 

Officials with Wilton, Conn.-based Blue Buffalo report that “tens of thousands of dollars” and hundreds of hours have been spent analyzing various batches of dog food, including samples from bags directly linked to specific cases of dogs testing positive for hypercalcemia and vitamin D toxicity.

 

Richard MacLean, vice president of business affairs, says one thing is certain: Test results thus far have shown nothing unusual about the product’s formulation; amounts of calcium and vitamin D, in particular, are within the company’s specifications and well below levels that might be considered toxic.

 

The company’s focus has been on Blue Buffalo Wilderness Chicken Recipe, manufactured in April 2010 with a best-used-by date of July 2011.

 

Vitamin D toxicity, or hypervitaminosis D, induces bone loss and abnormally high serum calcium levels, which could result in kidney stones and the calcification of organs like the heart and kidneys if left untreated.

 

“We really do take very seriously our commitment to providing health nutrition to pets,” MacLean says. “From the moment this issue came up, we are looking to find out if this is something we can do something about.”

 

Dr. Joy Mueller, a veterinarian in Santa Rosa, Calif., says the condition isn’t one that an owner will likely miss.

 

Recently, her two-year-old Australian shepherd became lethargic, releasing copious amounts of extremely dilute urine throughout her house and drinking large amounts of water. Heeding the red flags, she tested the dog’s blood and noted elevated calcium levels and a low platelet count. Hypercalcemia is often associated with kidney cancer and lymphoma.

 

Yet after ruling out possible problems with kidney function, Mueller turned to the Blue Buffalo Wilderness chicken and turkey flavored dry food that the dog had been eating for two weeks and changed brands.

 

The result was dramatic; the dog’s condition improved within 24 hours.

 

Mueller came to the association between the food and her dog’s condition independently of the VIN discussions on the topic, though she did not test her dog for elevated levels of vitamin D and cannot be certain that toxic levels of it prompted the animal’s illness. Still, she e-mailed the VIN News Service last Friday to spread the word about her findings to other veterinarians.

 

Reflecting on the turn of events, she says: “Vitamin D toxicosis was not my first thought. Various types of cancer including kidney cancer were the big rule outs. I wasn’t thinking food until I switched him.”

 

While Mueller believes that the food is tied to her dog’s condition, she suspects the reaction was idiosyncratic.

 

“It’s such a dramatic response that if a large number of dogs that ate this food had it, you would hear about more cases,” she says. “You can’t miss it peeing all the time and going through gallons of water.

 

“I suspect this has more to do with the dogs than the food,” Mueller adds. “I’m thinking beyond vitamin D. There may be dogs that have a genetic predisposition to the developing this condition after eating this food. It’s quite a mystery.”

 

Dr. Kathryn Cochran, a practitioner in Michigan, agrees. She reports that dogs of two different clients were examined in the practices where she works on June 30 and July 16. Both presented with hypercalcemia and test results showed high levels of vitamin D.

 

Another common thread: Both ate Blue Buffalo Wilderness Diet, chicken flavor, purchased at a PetSmart in Traverse City, Mich.

 

Cochran’s employer, Dr. Charles Morrison, posted the cases on VIN, and called the company. As a result, Blue Buffulo’s MacLean reports that seven bags were pulled from the Traverse City PetSmart, and tests were conducted on two. He reiterates that nothing unusual has come back on any of the samples analyzed by the company’s labs.

 

Cochran reports that the dogs have since recovered after being switched to a different brand of pet food. She notes that Blue Buffalo has been proactive about paying for tests, sending out claim forms and preparing to make restitution to owners if the product is found to have caused illness.

 

She’s concerned that other cases might not be identified.

 

“I’ve been tearing my hair out trying to get people to talk to me on this,” she says. “Maybe there are more cases out there like this.”

 

Experts in the field of diagnostics think so, too. Dr. Kent Refsal, an endocrinologist with the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health at Michigan State University, works at one of the only labs in America running tests for vitamin D toxicity.

 

“So if a veterinarian has an animal with an abnormality of calcium, they go through lists of differential diagnoses,” Refsal explains. “Our tests can sort through that. In terms of the kind of test outcomes we get, we do not see many instances that raise concern about vitamin D toxicosis.”

 

Considering the rarity of such events, Refsal took notice when the sample from Cochran tested positive for elevated levels of vitamin D.

 

Three weeks later, when Refsal received two samples in the same assay run from dogs in Texas showing evidence of vitamin D excess, he contacted the clinics in question and determined that the dogs were eating food from Blue Buffalo.

 

Since then, Refsal reports that similar tests results from two dogs in Colorado have Blue Buffalo-produced food as the common factor. The lab, he says, has contacted the Michigan Department of Agriculture with the findings, though the VIN News Service could not immediately reach agency officials concerning the cases.

 

“If someone is presented with a question of vitamin D toxicosis, you wonder whether the animal has been put on some kind of unusual dietary supplement. Our assay is just an indicator of vitamin D intake. It does not identify the source of it,” Refsal says.

 

Apart from diet, there are other possible explanations for hypervitaminosis D in animals, including exposure to vitamin D analogs like calcipotriene-based psoriasis creams or pest control products made of cholecalciferol.

 

Veterinarians like Mueller say those explanations are highly unlikely, and even MacLean, of Blue Buffalo, believes that it’s possible that there is a relationship between the food and the handful of sick dogs eating the product.

 

Yet, he cautions, no one has scientifically proven the link. He also notes that reports of at least three other dogs exhibiting signs of hypercalcemia and elevated vitamin D levels without a connection to Blue Buffalo products have surfaced on VIN.

 

MacLean reiterates that the company’s tests of its dog food have come back as low to mid-level for vitamin D content.

 

“Everything that we have suggests that it’s not our food,” he says. “We have 30,000 bags of this stuff out there and literally a dozen animals that have a common symptom. On an incident rate, that doesn’t invite the conclusion that there’s something defective about the product.”

 

 

August 31, 2010
By: Jennifer Fiala
For The VIN News Service

 

 

American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

 

CASE REPORT: Suspected acute meperidine toxicity in a Coton de Tulear dog

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Observations

A 22-month-old male neutered Coton De Tulear dog was presented for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy under general anesthesia. The anesthetic plan included premedication with intramuscular meperidine (4 mg kg−1) but meperidine was inadvertently administered at ten-fold this dose. Within 5 minutes, the dog was unresponsive to external stimulation, and by 10 minutes post-injection developed generalized signs of central nervous system (CNS) excitement.  Initial therapy included inspired oxygen supplementation, and single intravenous (IV) doses of diazepam (0.68 mg kg−1) and naloxone (0.03 mg kg−1) to no effect.   A second dose of diazepam (0.46 mg kg−1, IV) abolished most of the signs of CNS excitement. General anesthesia was induced and the endoscopy performed.  Time to extubation was initially prolonged, but administering naloxone (final dose 0.1 mg kg−1, IV) to effect enabled extubation. After naloxone, the dog became agitated, noise sensitive, and had leg and trunk muscle twitches. Diazepam (0.30 mg kg−1, IV) abolished these signs and the dog became heavily sedated and laterally recumbent. Naloxone administration was continued as a constant rate infusion (0.02 mg kg−1 hour−1, IV) until approximately 280 minutes post-meperidine injection, at which time the dog suddenly sat up. Occasional twitches of the leg and trunk muscles were observed during the night.   The dog was discharged the next day appearing clinically normal.

Conclusions

Given that the CNS excitatory effects of normeperidine are not a μ opioid receptor effect, the use of naloxone should be considered carefully when normeperidine excitotoxicity is suspected.   Benzodiazepines may be beneficial in ameliorating clinical signs of normeperidine excitotoxicity.

Full published study is available in

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Volume 37, Issue 5, pages 471–477, September 2010

  1. Francis J Golder1,
  2. Jeffrey Wilson1,
  3. M Paula Larenza1,
  4. Owen T Fink2

 

Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-2995.2010.00553.x

 

 

 

Alert provided by the American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

 

 

Steer Clear of Puppy Mills

HOUSTON – At least once every three months the SPCA raids a puppy mill in the Houston area.

There’s a big difference between what reputable dog breeders do and those who operate puppy mills.

“Puppy mills will put in all sorts of conditions and they will try to maximize their profit by minimizing the quality of care they give an animal,” said Charles Jentzen, with Houston’s SPCA.

And consumers can find themselves spending hundreds of dollars on sick or dying dogs.

“It’s very heartbreaking to know that you have to put down your pet,” Bethany Fulton said.

In a 2006 lawsuit Fulton, a reputable dog breeder accused a Houston area puppy mill owner of selling her Coton and Wheaten puppies infected with a highly contagious and deadly disease.

Fulton won her civil suit but no criminal action could be taken against the puppy mill owner.

“Currently there’s no laws that directly attribute to any kind of commercial or non commercial breeding operation,” Jentzen said.

“The state of Texas has an animal cruelty statute which covers the basic staple of life and that’s about it.”

Other states have recently toughened laws aimed at puppy mills.

That’s why there’s concern puppy mill owners will head for Texas to avoid all the rules now required by surrounding states.

“The law that we utilize addresses the minimums,” Jentzen said.

At least one local lawmaker wants to stiffen regulations for commercial breeding operations.

Stiffer laws, some say would benefit reputable dog breeders, consumers and above all our four legged friends.

Special thanks to RANDY WALLACE
Investigative Reporter with My Fox Houston

Support Code of Ethics Breeders

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com






Breeding & Whelping Seminar in Arizona

Myra Savant-Harris Seminar

Canine Reproduction and Whelping, And Puppy Intensive Care…

August 14th and 15th 2010
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. each day

  • Common misconceptions about conception,
  • How to care for your bitch and ensure her health every step of the way,
  • How to maximize sperm viability and protect your stud dog’s virility,
  • How to do artificial insemination using chilled or fresh semen from collection to assertion,
  • How to recognize puppies in distress, assess their problem, use heat, sub-Q fluids, oxygen, tube feeding, and more,
  • Progesterone testing,
  • How to get bitches in whelp,
  • How to deliver healthy puppies,
  • What you MUST have on hand to make a puppy intensive care nursery,
  • Plenty of other knowledge that is priceless!

Who should attend?

  • Every dog breeder, whether you are planning your first litter or your 20th.
  • If you have ever lost, or fear that you might someday lose a puppy or bitch,
  • If you have ever had a breeding that did not take, this seminar is a must.
  • Here is your chance to attend an incredible and worthwhile seminar.

Where – Mesa Community College
1833 W. Southern Ave
Mesa, AZ 85202
Seminar is in the Kiva Room in the Kirk Student Center.

Myra will have her books and whelping kits available for purchase at the seminar.

For more information visit: http://www.calienteallbreed.com/Upcoming-Events.htm

For more information about Myra Savant Harris visit:
http://www.myrasavantharris.com/schedule.html