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Posts Tagged ‘Education about Cotons’

New York Times article about AKC

Safety Concerns Stoke Criticism of Kennel Club

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/sports/many-animal-lovers-now-see-american-kennel-club-as-an-outlier.html

Cotons mentioned in New York Times article about the American Kennel Club.

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2012 Coton de Tulear Calendar

December 2012 Coton de Tulear calendar

Just in time for the holidays!!!

A beautiful new full color 11″ x 17″ wall calendar has been created by the American Coton Club and is now available for purchase. Featuring twelve months of stunning photographs showcasing Cotons from around the world depicting both the beauty and charm of the rare breed Coton de Tulear, this is a must-have item for the new year!

 

You will see the Coton de Tulear breed as a versatile, wonderful and unique dog capable of everything from being a great family companion, to competing in agility, swimming with the family and conformation show dog.

 

The rare breed Coton de Tulear does it all!

 

The ACC is a 501(c)3 non profit organization and proceeds from calendar sales will support health testing and educational programs for the Coton de Tulear.  The 2012 Coton de Tulear Calendar is the perfect gift for Coton lovers!!

 

In addition to lovely Coton photos shown on the main calendar pages there are also many more Coton photos throughout each month!

 

Click here to order your 2012 Coton de Tulear Calendar today!
**Free shipping on orders placed by December 31, 2011.**

….

American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

***

UCARE Supports “ACT”

 

UCARE Supports ACT, Advocates for the Coton de Tulear

 

Announcement from Jeri McClees and Jane Arrington, founders of UCARE:

 

When UCARE was formed in 2002 as the only nonprofit corporation committed to the Rescue of this wonderful breed, our articles of incorporation specified that the corporation was organized for the purpose of preventing and abating animal cruelty by rescuing, treating, altering, fostering and rehoming abused, neglected, ill, stray and unwanted Cotons.  Furthermore, UCARE was developed to educate current and prospective pet owners as to the proper care and breeding of dogs to prevent cruelty and allow them to make informed choices of where to obtain a Coton.

 

Never did we think that to fulfill this charter we would have to take an opposing stance to one of the Coton breed clubs and its goal to have the Coton recognized as an AKC “breed”. History has shown that AKC recognition exponentially increases the number of dogs in puppy mills (or “high volume breeder” facilities using the AKC nomenclature) and subjects those dogs to cruel and inhumane treatment. We feel that we have no choice but to assist in preserving the Coton breed as we know it and join in the battle against AKC recognition.

 

It is with sadness (but pride that others join us in our concerns and our basic goals) that we are making a contribution to the Advocates for the Coton de Tulear (ACT) in the amount of $5,000 in the hopes that it will prod others to join the battle and hopefully assist in winning the war against AKC recognition for the Coton de Tulear. The future of this wonderful breed is at risk if we don’t win that war!

 

Jeri & Jane, UCARE

 

P.S. If you wish to donate or get more information about ACT’s efforts, go to: http://advocatesforthecotondetulear.blogspot.com/

 

Until there are none, please rescue one.
UCARE: a 501(c)3 non-profit organization

The American Coton Club applauds UCARE’s decision!

American Coton Club

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

The American Kennel Club can not survive in its present form. Judges and show breeders are deserting as AKC puts dollars, deals and puppy mills first.

Barbara J. Andrews, Editor-In-Chief of TheDogPress published the following information about the AKC in their newsletter today.

The AKC FAQ facts page states:
Internationally, there are approximately 400 breeds that are listed with registry organizations in other countries. The AKC, however, does not register all of these breeds, either because there are too few dogs (of that breed) in this country or there is too little interest among owners of these breeds to obtain AKC registered status. Because the AKC is a “club of clubs,” owners of a particular breed, wishing to have that breed registered, must establish an organized National Breed Club.                                
http://www.akc.org/press_center/facts_stats.cfm?page=8

Please let the AKC know that the owners of purebred Coton de Tuléar have no interest in AKC. Sign the petition to Save the Coton de Tuléar dog breed from the AKC and puppymills!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/95/Protect-the-rare-breed-Coton-de-Tulear/

Cotons say NO to AKC!

Veterinarians report mysterious link between dog food and hypercalcemia

Veterinary Information Network (VIN) reports:

Veterinarians are trying to discern whether roughly a dozen dogs testing positive for hypercalcemia and consuming the same high-end diet is merely coincidence or a problem with the pet food in question.

 

The reports have cropped up on the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession and parent of the VIN News Service. In message board discussions, veterinarians have revealed cases of hypercalcemia secondary to vitamin D toxicosis occurring in dogs that eat a single brand of dry pet food: Blue Buffalo Wilderness Diet, chicken flavor. In each of the cases, veterinarians report that dogs’ conditions have improved after switching brands.

 

So far, nothing concrete has identified a causal relationship between the food and illnesses in dogs. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), while reportedly alerted to adverse events tied to the food, has not prompted a recall, though the VIN News Service has been unable to reach officials with the regulatory agency directly.

 

Officials with Wilton, Conn.-based Blue Buffalo report that “tens of thousands of dollars” and hundreds of hours have been spent analyzing various batches of dog food, including samples from bags directly linked to specific cases of dogs testing positive for hypercalcemia and vitamin D toxicity.

 

Richard MacLean, vice president of business affairs, says one thing is certain: Test results thus far have shown nothing unusual about the product’s formulation; amounts of calcium and vitamin D, in particular, are within the company’s specifications and well below levels that might be considered toxic.

 

The company’s focus has been on Blue Buffalo Wilderness Chicken Recipe, manufactured in April 2010 with a best-used-by date of July 2011.

 

Vitamin D toxicity, or hypervitaminosis D, induces bone loss and abnormally high serum calcium levels, which could result in kidney stones and the calcification of organs like the heart and kidneys if left untreated.

 

“We really do take very seriously our commitment to providing health nutrition to pets,” MacLean says. “From the moment this issue came up, we are looking to find out if this is something we can do something about.”

 

Dr. Joy Mueller, a veterinarian in Santa Rosa, Calif., says the condition isn’t one that an owner will likely miss.

 

Recently, her two-year-old Australian shepherd became lethargic, releasing copious amounts of extremely dilute urine throughout her house and drinking large amounts of water. Heeding the red flags, she tested the dog’s blood and noted elevated calcium levels and a low platelet count. Hypercalcemia is often associated with kidney cancer and lymphoma.

 

Yet after ruling out possible problems with kidney function, Mueller turned to the Blue Buffalo Wilderness chicken and turkey flavored dry food that the dog had been eating for two weeks and changed brands.

 

The result was dramatic; the dog’s condition improved within 24 hours.

 

Mueller came to the association between the food and her dog’s condition independently of the VIN discussions on the topic, though she did not test her dog for elevated levels of vitamin D and cannot be certain that toxic levels of it prompted the animal’s illness. Still, she e-mailed the VIN News Service last Friday to spread the word about her findings to other veterinarians.

 

Reflecting on the turn of events, she says: “Vitamin D toxicosis was not my first thought. Various types of cancer including kidney cancer were the big rule outs. I wasn’t thinking food until I switched him.”

 

While Mueller believes that the food is tied to her dog’s condition, she suspects the reaction was idiosyncratic.

 

“It’s such a dramatic response that if a large number of dogs that ate this food had it, you would hear about more cases,” she says. “You can’t miss it peeing all the time and going through gallons of water.

 

“I suspect this has more to do with the dogs than the food,” Mueller adds. “I’m thinking beyond vitamin D. There may be dogs that have a genetic predisposition to the developing this condition after eating this food. It’s quite a mystery.”

 

Dr. Kathryn Cochran, a practitioner in Michigan, agrees. She reports that dogs of two different clients were examined in the practices where she works on June 30 and July 16. Both presented with hypercalcemia and test results showed high levels of vitamin D.

 

Another common thread: Both ate Blue Buffalo Wilderness Diet, chicken flavor, purchased at a PetSmart in Traverse City, Mich.

 

Cochran’s employer, Dr. Charles Morrison, posted the cases on VIN, and called the company. As a result, Blue Buffulo’s MacLean reports that seven bags were pulled from the Traverse City PetSmart, and tests were conducted on two. He reiterates that nothing unusual has come back on any of the samples analyzed by the company’s labs.

 

Cochran reports that the dogs have since recovered after being switched to a different brand of pet food. She notes that Blue Buffalo has been proactive about paying for tests, sending out claim forms and preparing to make restitution to owners if the product is found to have caused illness.

 

She’s concerned that other cases might not be identified.

 

“I’ve been tearing my hair out trying to get people to talk to me on this,” she says. “Maybe there are more cases out there like this.”

 

Experts in the field of diagnostics think so, too. Dr. Kent Refsal, an endocrinologist with the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health at Michigan State University, works at one of the only labs in America running tests for vitamin D toxicity.

 

“So if a veterinarian has an animal with an abnormality of calcium, they go through lists of differential diagnoses,” Refsal explains. “Our tests can sort through that. In terms of the kind of test outcomes we get, we do not see many instances that raise concern about vitamin D toxicosis.”

 

Considering the rarity of such events, Refsal took notice when the sample from Cochran tested positive for elevated levels of vitamin D.

 

Three weeks later, when Refsal received two samples in the same assay run from dogs in Texas showing evidence of vitamin D excess, he contacted the clinics in question and determined that the dogs were eating food from Blue Buffalo.

 

Since then, Refsal reports that similar tests results from two dogs in Colorado have Blue Buffalo-produced food as the common factor. The lab, he says, has contacted the Michigan Department of Agriculture with the findings, though the VIN News Service could not immediately reach agency officials concerning the cases.

 

“If someone is presented with a question of vitamin D toxicosis, you wonder whether the animal has been put on some kind of unusual dietary supplement. Our assay is just an indicator of vitamin D intake. It does not identify the source of it,” Refsal says.

 

Apart from diet, there are other possible explanations for hypervitaminosis D in animals, including exposure to vitamin D analogs like calcipotriene-based psoriasis creams or pest control products made of cholecalciferol.

 

Veterinarians like Mueller say those explanations are highly unlikely, and even MacLean, of Blue Buffalo, believes that it’s possible that there is a relationship between the food and the handful of sick dogs eating the product.

 

Yet, he cautions, no one has scientifically proven the link. He also notes that reports of at least three other dogs exhibiting signs of hypercalcemia and elevated vitamin D levels without a connection to Blue Buffalo products have surfaced on VIN.

 

MacLean reiterates that the company’s tests of its dog food have come back as low to mid-level for vitamin D content.

 

“Everything that we have suggests that it’s not our food,” he says. “We have 30,000 bags of this stuff out there and literally a dozen animals that have a common symptom. On an incident rate, that doesn’t invite the conclusion that there’s something defective about the product.”

 

 

August 31, 2010
By: Jennifer Fiala
For The VIN News Service

 

 

American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

 

K9 College Cruise

K9 College is fun!

Katie Markley is happy to announce that Sue Vroom will be back on board with us in 2011 to conduct her new dog handling seminar. During her seminar, “Tips and Techniques for Traumaless Dog Showing”, Sue will draw from her lifetime of experience as a professional handler to help Owner/Handlers improve their chances in the conformation ring.

Many other seminars will be conducted during the 7th annual K9 College Cruise.  You’re sure to find many that will interest you!  Call today to reserve your kennel!  You’ll find detailed information at the K9 College website:  www.k9collegecruise.com

Other seminars to be presented during the 2011 K9 College Cruise include:

  • Managing Puppy Development to Maximize Potential, Dr. Carmen Battaglia
  • Pedigree Analysis for a Better Breeding Program, Dr. Carmen Battaglia
  • Immunology and Nutrition, Dr. Jill Cline
  • Probiotics, Dr. Jill Cline
  • Law for Dogs: A Primer for Breeders and Owners, Lisa Curry, Esq.
  • K9 Structure in Action, Pat Hastngs
  • Tricks of the Trade, Pat Hastings
  • K9 Reproduction, Dr. Robert Van Hutchison
  • K9 Pediatrics – Dr. Robert Van Hutchison
  • Genetics for the 21st Century, Dr. Anita Oberbauer
  • Genetic Tests, Dr. Anita Oberbauer
  • Ask Mary! ~ Agility, Rally, Obedience, Flyuball, Freestyle, Mary Ray
  • Preparing the Dog for a Mentally & Physically Healthy Life, Turid Rugaas
  • The Emotional Lives of Dogs, Turid Rugaas

Hope to meet you on-board!


If any Coton de Tulear owners or breeders attend please let us know and we’ll post an update about your trip here on the Coton de Tulear News page.


cruise ship itinerary

Looks like a great trip!

 

 

 

 

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

info@AmericanCotonClub.com


CASE REPORT: Suspected acute meperidine toxicity in a Coton de Tulear dog

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Observations

A 22-month-old male neutered Coton De Tulear dog was presented for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy under general anesthesia. The anesthetic plan included premedication with intramuscular meperidine (4 mg kg−1) but meperidine was inadvertently administered at ten-fold this dose. Within 5 minutes, the dog was unresponsive to external stimulation, and by 10 minutes post-injection developed generalized signs of central nervous system (CNS) excitement.  Initial therapy included inspired oxygen supplementation, and single intravenous (IV) doses of diazepam (0.68 mg kg−1) and naloxone (0.03 mg kg−1) to no effect.   A second dose of diazepam (0.46 mg kg−1, IV) abolished most of the signs of CNS excitement. General anesthesia was induced and the endoscopy performed.  Time to extubation was initially prolonged, but administering naloxone (final dose 0.1 mg kg−1, IV) to effect enabled extubation. After naloxone, the dog became agitated, noise sensitive, and had leg and trunk muscle twitches. Diazepam (0.30 mg kg−1, IV) abolished these signs and the dog became heavily sedated and laterally recumbent. Naloxone administration was continued as a constant rate infusion (0.02 mg kg−1 hour−1, IV) until approximately 280 minutes post-meperidine injection, at which time the dog suddenly sat up. Occasional twitches of the leg and trunk muscles were observed during the night.   The dog was discharged the next day appearing clinically normal.

Conclusions

Given that the CNS excitatory effects of normeperidine are not a μ opioid receptor effect, the use of naloxone should be considered carefully when normeperidine excitotoxicity is suspected.   Benzodiazepines may be beneficial in ameliorating clinical signs of normeperidine excitotoxicity.

Full published study is available in

Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia

Volume 37, Issue 5, pages 471–477, September 2010

  1. Francis J Golder1,
  2. Jeffrey Wilson1,
  3. M Paula Larenza1,
  4. Owen T Fink2

 

Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-2995.2010.00553.x

 

 

 

Alert provided by the American Coton Club
Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear
http://AmericanCotonClub.com
info@AmericanCotonClub.com

 

 

 

Merrick Recalls Texas Hold’ems 10 oz. Bag Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

Merrick Pet Care Recalls Texas Hold’ems 10 oz. Bag (Item# 600616 Lot 10127 Best By May 6, 2010) Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

08.03.2010

Merrick Pet Care, Inc. of Amarillo, Texas is extending its July 2, 2010 recall of 10oz “Beef Filet Squares for Dogs (Texas Hold’Ems)” pet treat (ITEM # 60016 LOT # 10084TL7 BEST BY MARCH 24, 2012) to also include 83 cases of “Texas Hold’ems” (ITEM # 60016 LOT # 10127 BEST BY MAY 6, 2012) because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. Salmonella can affect animals and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products. People handling the treats can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the chews or any surfaces exposed to these products. Consumers should dispose of these products in a safe manner by securing them in a covered trash receptacle.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers immediately.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

The Beef Filet Squares (Texas Hold ‘Ems) were shipped to distributors and retailers throughout the US. These individuals have been notified and have activated their recall procedures.

The treats are sold in 10oz plastic bags marked with “Lot # 10127 Best By May 6, 2012” on the top of the bag and on a sticker applied to the bottom.

No illnesses have been reported to date for either lot of product. A sample tested positive for Salmonella.

Consumers who have purchased 10 ounce packages of “Texas Hold’ems” are urged to return the unused portion to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-800-664-7387 M-F 8:00 – 5:00 CDT.

Source:  http://www.merrickpetcare.com/about_us/news_article.php?tid=434

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

Visit ACC at:  http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com

Steer Clear of Puppy Mills

HOUSTON – At least once every three months the SPCA raids a puppy mill in the Houston area.

There’s a big difference between what reputable dog breeders do and those who operate puppy mills.

“Puppy mills will put in all sorts of conditions and they will try to maximize their profit by minimizing the quality of care they give an animal,” said Charles Jentzen, with Houston’s SPCA.

And consumers can find themselves spending hundreds of dollars on sick or dying dogs.

“It’s very heartbreaking to know that you have to put down your pet,” Bethany Fulton said.

In a 2006 lawsuit Fulton, a reputable dog breeder accused a Houston area puppy mill owner of selling her Coton and Wheaten puppies infected with a highly contagious and deadly disease.

Fulton won her civil suit but no criminal action could be taken against the puppy mill owner.

“Currently there’s no laws that directly attribute to any kind of commercial or non commercial breeding operation,” Jentzen said.

“The state of Texas has an animal cruelty statute which covers the basic staple of life and that’s about it.”

Other states have recently toughened laws aimed at puppy mills.

That’s why there’s concern puppy mill owners will head for Texas to avoid all the rules now required by surrounding states.

“The law that we utilize addresses the minimums,” Jentzen said.

At least one local lawmaker wants to stiffen regulations for commercial breeding operations.

Stiffer laws, some say would benefit reputable dog breeders, consumers and above all our four legged friends.

Special thanks to RANDY WALLACE
Investigative Reporter with My Fox Houston

Support Code of Ethics Breeders

American Coton Club

Home of the Rare Breed Coton de Tulear

http://www.AmericanCotonClub.com